Grant from the Freemasons helps us sustain our Balanced Lives programmes

Action For Elders innovative Balanced Lives programmes have been recognised for their progress in the physical, mental and social wellbeing of those in later life. The Later Life Inclusion grant from the Masonic Charitable Foundation has made it possible to sustain our programmes.

Sustainability is proven to be important in the health and wellbeing of older people. It's crucial that we continue our programmes in local communities and reach out to vulnerable older people to help turn their lives around.

Masonic Charitable Trust representatives Rob Payne, William Jenkins and Grenville Thomas visited a successful programme at Hazel Court, Sketty Park, Swansea in October to see Balanced Lives in action and witness the incredible health benefits. Some of the representatives even joined the participants in the programme to experience the benefits first hand. They were joined by James Lewis (CEO Action For Elders).

The Later Life Inclusion grant from South Wales Freemasons runs over three years and comes through the Masonic Charitable Foundation, which is funded by freemasons, their families and friends, from across England and Wales.

The events of the day were filmed by the Masonic Charity Foundation. Take a look at the short film above.

James Lewis, CEO at Action for Elders said:

“We’re really grateful to South Wales Freemasons for their generous grant, which will help us in our hugely important work with older people from across Wales. People are living longer in our society, but far too often they have a terrible quality of life. Our aim is to help them have better physical and mental health as well as staying as full members of our local communities.”

William Jenkins from South Wales Freemasons said:

“I’m very pleased we’ve been able to help Action for Elders with their work. It’s vitally important that our senior citizens get the help they need to keep and improve their physical and mental health, while avoiding the loneliness and social isolation that is, sadly, all too common among older people today.”